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Table 3 Practices of treatment and referral of various eye disease cases in children

From: Knowledge, attitude and practice of Ethiopian pediatricians concerning childhood eye diseases

Question Respondent’s answer(s) n (%)
Do you do eye examinations on children? (n = 79) Yes 68 (86.1)
No 11 (13.9)
How frequently do you perform eye examinations? (n = 68) Every visit 29 (36.7)
When I see an eye problem 21 (26.6)
When caregiver complains 18 (22.8)
Which test do you usually do? (n = 68) Pupillary response 59 (74.7)
Ocular motility 39 (49.4)
Visual acuity 31 (39.2)
Fundus examination 1 (1.3)
What is/are reasons not to do eye examination? (n = 11) Not adequately trained 5 (6.3)
Not my responsibility 1 (1.3)
Time-consuming 1 (1.3)
Difficult (i.e. children uncooperative) 2 (2.5)
I do not know how to examine 2 (2.5)
How do you manage children with red-eye (n = 79) Give eye drops and refer if no improvement 39 (49.4)
Give eye drops 29 (36.7)
Give eye drops and refer immediately 6 (7.6)
Refer immediately 5 (6.3)
What do you do for a child who squints? (n = 79) Refer immediately to eye-care worker 74 (93.7)
Follow up and refer if it fails to resolve 5 (6.3)
What do you do for a child in whom you suspect retinoblastoma? (n = 79) Immediately refer to eye-care center 59 (74.7)
Order CT-scan 17 (21.5)
Order B-scan ultrasonography 3 (3.8)
What do you do for a child with a congenital cataract? (n = 79) Immediately refer to eye-care worker 79 (100.0)
What do you do for a child you might suspect of having congenital glaucoma? (n = 79) Refer to eye-care worker immediately 77 (97.5)
Give eye drops and follow up 2 (2.5)
What do you do for a child with congenital tearing? (n = 79) Immediately refer to eye-care worker 47 (59.5)
Maintain observation 23 (29.1)
Reassure the family 6 (7.6)
Give eye drops and send home 3 (3.8)
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